Meyer, Sharon A., Ph.D.

Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Toxicology

College of Health and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Toxicology
Bienville Building 262
(318) 342-1685
meyer@ulm.edu
Media Topics: 

Pesticides: responsible use of chemicals in agriculture; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s conservatory approach protects against adverse human health effects; environmental damage from pesticides

Chemical warfare agents: chemicals likely to be used in an attack, their toxic effects and effective antidotes

Brownfield contaminants: economic and development potential of sites previously considered “priority contaminated areas” under the Superfund Act, when sufficiently remediated to contain contaminants at levels below reasonably considered hazardous, is compelling

Speaker Topics: 

Pesticides. Responsible use of chemicals in agriculture is an economic reality for production of an affordable national food supply. Dr. Meyer discusses how the conservative approach of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is protecting against adverse human health effects and environmental damage from pesticides may have moved us from the age of a "silent spring" to a raucous autumn.
Chemical warfare agents. The current climate of anti-Western sentiment and changing warfare tactics has heightened the risk of exposure of U.S. residents to chemical warfare agents. Dr. Meyer identifies those chemicals which are likely to be used in an attack, their toxic effects and effective antidotes and measures to counter the threat of these agents.
Brownfield contaminants. The economic and development potential of sites previously considered priority contaminated areas under the Superfund Act, when sufficiently remediated to contain contaminants at levels below reasonably considered hazardous, is compelling. One successful example exists in our own community. How does EPA determine when contaminant removal is sufficient to be "safe". Are there unknown potential poisons lurking at these sites that could move to our residential areas, our water supplies, etc. Dr. Meyer discusses how the risk assessment is done to designate a previous Superfund site as a "Brownfield" and resultant probability of off-site exposure to citizens.